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Running Shoe buying Guide

Running Shoe buying Guide

Nowadays buying the right running shoe is a complicated affair because of the variety in brands, technology, and aesthetics. Top reasons why people select a particular shoe are its aesthetic, brand and their favorite celebrity endorsing it. A good running shoe regardless of above criteria should be one which compliments your foot type and requirement. It doesn’t matter if the shoe which works wonders to your friend’s running will do the same for you. All foot types are different and all feet behave differently when placed in load bearing activities.




Foot and ankle make an important part in how your whole body mechanics will work. Foot is the first area which comes in contact with ground and decides how the gravitation forces will act on different joints of your body.

  • Know your foot type
  • Which time of the day you should buy your shoe
  • Selecting a brand of shoe
  • Particulars to carry with you to shop
  • How to check a shoe









Are your feet normal??

There’s no such thing as normal: variety in healthy feet

Article by Timothy Maiden

Tim photo

Senior Podiatrist at The Foot Practice (Singapore)


“Is it normal?” must be one of the most commonly asked questions in medical history.

There’s actually been surprisingly little research done on ‘normal’ feet in adults.  Because feet are hidden away in shoes most of the time, we don’t see the natural variation the way we do with facial features or body shape.  People only seek medical help if they’re in pain, so there’s lots of research done about conditions like bunions or hammer toes, but very little done about the range of different shapes which characterise healthy feet.

The rough estimate is that around 11% of adults have flat feet (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266142136_Prevalence_of_flat_foot_among_18_-25_years_old_physiotherapy_students_cross_sectional_study), while high arches affect around 10-15% (http://www.acnr.co.uk/2013/01/pes-cavus-not-just-a-clinical-sign-diagnosis-aetiology-and-management/), and everyone else is ‘normal’.  The statistics indicate that children have higher rates of foot deformities – but perhaps this is just because attentive parents take their children to the doctor for fairly mild problems, whereas adults are less keen to seek help for themselves. (http://www2.cmu.edu.tw/~mtjm/full-text/14%281%29p1-9.PDF)




Feet are often divided into categories according to their appearance.  “Peasant” feet are square-looking with stubby toes all a similar length; “Greek” feet have a peaked appearance, with the second toe longer than the big toe; and “Egyptian” feet look tapered, with the big toe the longest and the others of decreasing sizes.  But these aren’t medical descriptions, just loose descriptions used by shoe manufacturers. (http://www.pointeshoesonline.com/foot-shape/)

The official description of a normal foot, as found in medical textbooks, is a list of features written by a long-dead podiatrist and never really tested by science (http://www.podiatrytoday.com/what-%E2%80%98normal%E2%80%99-foot).  Sydney University is currently conducting a “1000 Norms” project, collecting and analysing data on the anatomy of healthy people (http://sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/research/1000-norms.shtml), but it will be years until the project is completed and we have a clearer picture.




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Plantar Fasciitis : Most common cause of heel pain

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common conditions leading to heel pain. It is commonly seen in people who spend long hours standing. Plantar fascia is a thick fibrous tissue which runs from heel to toes and is responsible in maintaining the arch and overall shape of the foot. Excessive forces on plantar fascia causes micro tears and degeneration which leads to inflammation and pain. Pain is worse early in the morning and after prolonged hours of sitting or standing. Location of pain is usually at the heel but in some cases it can be present at the arch of the foot.

Causes:

  • Jobs involving prolonged standing
  • Weak and tight foot and ankle musculature
  • Stiff ankle joint
  • History of ankle sprain
  • Overweight
  • High arch or flat foot type
  • Improper footwear with reduced support

Treatment options:

Get a proper diagnosis done by a physiotherapist or an orthopedic

  • Conservative treatment
  • Injection treatment (cortisone shot)
  • Shock-wave therapy

Conservative treatment:

  • Stretching exercises for plantar fascia and calf muscles (see pics 1,2,3 below)
  • Ball roll on plantar fascia (see pic 4)
  • Foam rolling on calf and hamstrings to improve flexibility
  • Strengthening exercises of foot and leg to improve shock absorption
  • Icing over the inflamed area
  • Ankle joint mobilization
  • Soft tissue mobilization
  • Wearing proper footwear with good arch support
  • Avoid walking barefoot
  • Use of night splints to keep muscles and fascia in stretched position
  • Tapping helps supporting the foot and reduce strain on Fascia
  • Custom Insoles or orthotic devices to correct foot biomechanics if required

Plantar Fascia stretch

_20151122_131956

Pic 1

Calf Stretch

calf-1

Pic 2 – Bend Knee calf (Soleus) stretch

calf-2

Pic 3 -Straight Knee (Gastrocnemius) Stretch

plantar fasciitis

Pic 4 – Ball roll on plantar fascia

 

Rehab Mantra
Stay Fit. Love Life

READ OTHER ARTICLES

Running Shoe buying Guide

Running Shoe buying Guide

Nowadays buying the right running shoe is a complicated affair because of the variety in brands, technology, and aesthetics. Top reasons why people select a particular shoe are its aesthetic, brand and their favorite celebrity endorsing it. A good running shoe regardless of above criteria should be one which compliments your foot type and requirement. It doesn’t matter if the shoe which works wonders to your friend’s running will do the same for you. All foot types are different and all feet behave differently when placed in load bearing activities.




Foot and ankle make an important part in how your whole body mechanics will work. Foot is the first area which comes in contact with ground and decides how the gravitation forces will act on different joints of your body.

  • Know your foot type
  • Which time of the day you should buy your shoe
  • Selecting a brand of shoe
  • Particulars to carry with you to shop
  • How to check a shoe









Are your feet normal??

There’s no such thing as normal: variety in healthy feet

Article by Timothy Maiden

Tim photo

Senior Podiatrist at The Foot Practice (Singapore)


“Is it normal?” must be one of the most commonly asked questions in medical history.

There’s actually been surprisingly little research done on ‘normal’ feet in adults.  Because feet are hidden away in shoes most of the time, we don’t see the natural variation the way we do with facial features or body shape.  People only seek medical help if they’re in pain, so there’s lots of research done about conditions like bunions or hammer toes, but very little done about the range of different shapes which characterise healthy feet.

The rough estimate is that around 11% of adults have flat feet (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266142136_Prevalence_of_flat_foot_among_18_-25_years_old_physiotherapy_students_cross_sectional_study), while high arches affect around 10-15% (http://www.acnr.co.uk/2013/01/pes-cavus-not-just-a-clinical-sign-diagnosis-aetiology-and-management/), and everyone else is ‘normal’.  The statistics indicate that children have higher rates of foot deformities – but perhaps this is just because attentive parents take their children to the doctor for fairly mild problems, whereas adults are less keen to seek help for themselves. (http://www2.cmu.edu.tw/~mtjm/full-text/14%281%29p1-9.PDF)




Feet are often divided into categories according to their appearance.  “Peasant” feet are square-looking with stubby toes all a similar length; “Greek” feet have a peaked appearance, with the second toe longer than the big toe; and “Egyptian” feet look tapered, with the big toe the longest and the others of decreasing sizes.  But these aren’t medical descriptions, just loose descriptions used by shoe manufacturers. (http://www.pointeshoesonline.com/foot-shape/)

The official description of a normal foot, as found in medical textbooks, is a list of features written by a long-dead podiatrist and never really tested by science (http://www.podiatrytoday.com/what-%E2%80%98normal%E2%80%99-foot).  Sydney University is currently conducting a “1000 Norms” project, collecting and analysing data on the anatomy of healthy people (http://sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/research/1000-norms.shtml), but it will be years until the project is completed and we have a clearer picture.




Continue readingNext page



Plantar Fasciitis : Most common cause of heel pain

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common conditions leading to heel pain. It is commonly seen in people who spend long hours standing. Plantar fascia is a thick fibrous tissue which runs from heel to toes and is responsible in maintaining the arch and overall shape of the foot. Excessive forces on plantar fascia causes micro tears and degeneration which leads to inflammation and pain. Pain is worse early in the morning and after prolonged hours of sitting or standing. Location of pain is usually at the heel but in some cases it can be present at the arch of the foot.

Causes:

  • Jobs involving prolonged standing
  • Weak and tight foot and ankle musculature
  • Stiff ankle joint
  • History of ankle sprain
  • Overweight
  • High arch or flat foot type
  • Improper footwear with reduced support

Treatment options:

Get a proper diagnosis done by a physiotherapist or an orthopedic

  • Conservative treatment
  • Injection treatment (cortisone shot)
  • Shock-wave therapy

Conservative treatment:

  • Stretching exercises for plantar fascia and calf muscles (see pics 1,2,3 below)
  • Ball roll on plantar fascia (see pic 4)
  • Foam rolling on calf and hamstrings to improve flexibility
  • Strengthening exercises of foot and leg to improve shock absorption
  • Icing over the inflamed area
  • Ankle joint mobilization
  • Soft tissue mobilization
  • Wearing proper footwear with good arch support
  • Avoid walking barefoot
  • Use of night splints to keep muscles and fascia in stretched position
  • Tapping helps supporting the foot and reduce strain on Fascia
  • Custom Insoles or orthotic devices to correct foot biomechanics if required

Plantar Fascia stretch

_20151122_131956

Pic 1

Calf Stretch

calf-1

Pic 2 – Bend Knee calf (Soleus) stretch

calf-2

Pic 3 -Straight Knee (Gastrocnemius) Stretch

plantar fasciitis

Pic 4 – Ball roll on plantar fascia

 

Rehab Mantra
Stay Fit. Love Life

READ OTHER ARTICLES