Improve Hip Mobility To Prevent Low Back Pain

Hip Mobility and low back pain

Hip mobility is a major factor in deciding how your low back will behave overtime. Hip joint movement restriction has been found to be one of the major factors in developing low back pain. These two areas are so closely related that they work in conjunction at times. Change in the appropriate proportion of hip and low back (lumbar spine) movement can lead to movement dysfunction and injury. Considering a movement such as a squat (Fig. 1), where low back should be kept neutral throughout, with full movement occurring at hip. If hip range is limited due to joint stiffness or muscular tightness, it can force the lumbar spine to flex and lead to injury.

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Fig. 1

It is also noteworthy that this disproportion in ROM(range of motion) has been increasing day by day. Following this, the low back problems are at a high. We can relate reduce hip mobility to ever increasing sitting habits, inability to do a full squat and lack of Stretching and cool down in sports. So, why or what leads to this kind of movement dysfunction?

Factors leading affecting Hip mobility – Next Page

Let’s do it right – 5 essential exercise tips

Let’s do it right – 5 essential exercise tips

Exercise is great for everyone, as they help maintain your physical and mental wellness. Exercises can be divided into different categories depending on what we are trying to achieve. There are strengthening exercises, stretching exercises, balance and coordination exercises and cardiovascular (aerobic) exercises. They can be further divided into their respective subcategories.  All the four types of exercises are important in order to achieve a better output with respect to injury prevention and physical and mental fitness.

But if the exercises are done in a wrong manner, they can have a worse effect on your body leading to overuse or acute injuries. In this series of articles “let’s do it right” we will go through the basics of exercising and right form of exercises.

Components of your workout routine

People have a tendency to stick to one kind of workout routine neglecting other variables of exercises. For example, a person who loves to run but ignores stretching and strengthening exercises will have a higher chance of injury than a person doing all three in a balanced way.

A good workout routine involves exercises which target all 4 components of exercise. But being said that it’s not that all the 4 components need to have separate exercises, one exercise can target 2-3 components together. For example Lunges – involves balance, strength and stretch.

Start with warm-up and end with cool down

All your workouts or sports should start with a good 10-15 minutes warm-up. A good warm-up includes body temperature raising activities like jogging or spot jogging followed by dynamic stretches and sports specific or workout specific drills. Whereas cool down should consist of short recovery run or walk and static stretches.

Sequencing of exercises

Stable lumbopelvic area

Exercise technique

Difficulty targeting hamstring flexibility?

 Difficulty targeting hamstring flexibility?

One of the main causes of musculoskeletal injuries is soft tissue tightness or weakness. When we talk about tightness the first muscle that comes to our mind is Hamstring. Hamstring has almost become like a synonym to tightness. Let it be your coach, friend, doctor, physio or social media everyone points out and suggests stretches to relieve hamstring tightness. However, in spite of spending enough time on stretching, many people complain of temporary to no change in its flexibility.

It is important to understand the reason why your hamstring tightens up so easily. It is equally essential to comprehend its significance in injury prevention and treatment, and the correct way to increase its flexibility.

Hamstring functions as a knee flexor (bending knee), moving the heel towards the buttock and also as hip extensors (kicking back) moving the leg to the rear. Hamstring muscle is an antagonist to quadriceps (muscle in front of the thigh). Hamstring helps in deceleration of the lower leg when in movement. The three muscles which are present in the posterior thigh are semimembranosus, semitendinosus and bisceps femoris (short and long head). They all originate from ischial tuberosity (sit bone) and attach on the leg bones (tibia and fibula).

Move your nerves and relieve your pain



After a long day at work or prolonged sitting, people experience stiffness in the joints and muscles. Then a simple stretch gives so much relief, however many times a nagging discomfort stays there no matter how nicely you have stretched your muscle. The tight muscle which is not responding to your stretch might actually be a nerve. Like our muscles, nerves also get tight from staying in a certain position for too long or tightening of muscles around the nerve.

The key to relieve discomfort coming from nerves is simple – stretch it – floss it or glide it. Nerves also get blood supply and this supply can be increased from these simple techniques. It also helps in improving the movement of the nerve along the joints and muscles by improving their ability to glide.

Below are few simple ways to stretch or floss the nerves. There are many variations to it depending upon location of tightness, symptoms and limiting factors such as joint mobility or any existing conditions.

Upper body nerve stretch

Three main nerves that need to be stretched in the upper body are median nerve, radial nerve and ulnar nerve. To stretch theses nerves is simple and fun as the movement is quite similar to dancing.

Median nerve – (on a call position) Place open palm on your ear as if you are on a call and elbow out and in line with shoulder. Now straighten up your elbow while keeping the wrist in same bend position feel the stretch and come back to starting position. The stretch feel would be in your arm and palm.

median nerve stretch

median nerve stretch


Combined nerve stretch

Next page – Ulnar nerve and Radial nerve Stretch

Foam Roller – A friend worth having

Foam Roller

Muscle tightness is a common thing, be it a sportsperson or someone who has a sedentary lifestyle. The only difference would be in the muscle group getting affected with respect to their sport and lifestyle. It will always be the more dominant muscle group used in any sport or activity prone to tightness. For example, a runner would develop tightness in leg muscles, a kayak will develop tightness in upper body and a desk bound person would develop tightness in upper back and neck. Many of the musculoskeletal conditions such as knee pain, hip pain, neck pain, muscle/tendon injuries and many more are a result of muscle tightness.

Muscle tightness and trigger points, commonly known as “Knots” in the muscle, are a result of activities or compensation happening in our bodily movement through our sports or lifestyle. Both have same contributing factors such as training load, poor posture, lifestyle factors, hydration, lack of rest, stress and diet. When these factors increase and exceed our ability to recover, it results is tight muscles and trigger points.

The most commonly used method to target muscle tightness is stretching and massage. Stretching is one of the easiest and cost effective techniques known but it’s also the most ignored and incorrectly done technique at the same time. In many cases only stretching is not sufficient to target muscle tightness. Massage is a convenient and relaxing technique but at the same time costly and time consuming. Not all types of massage target your muscle tightness until they are deep tissue massage or sports massage.

Foam Roller

This is where Foam Roller comes in handy as an easy and convenient way to work on the tight muscles. Foam rolling is a self-administered technique, which is both time and cost effective.

Continue Reading – frequency, duration and technique